Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…
Emily is bragging, though what she says is true. This statement provides us with a concise exposition of Emily’s character and also connects later to her realization that people are essentially blind. Emily is very bright. Though she is bragging about being the “brightest girl in school”, she is not exaggerating. She is bright, articulate, and, despite the anxiety she shares with her mother, a beautiful creature. Other characters recognize Emily’s intellect as well. George comments on Emily’s ease with school work in their first meeting of the play. When Emily tells her mother that she is the brightest girl in her class, she strikes a tone of childish confidence. She is literally expressing the brightness of her character, her hopes, her joy, and her desire for approval and success. This tone can be seen as “closed off” in the context of Emily’s post-death revelation. As a girl, Emily is aware only of herself and her needs and is blind to the wealth of beauty around her.

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?
Advantages to the Wealthy vs. Disadvantages to the Poor or Fairness in Wealth Distribution; Man-made vs. Naturally-made, as in the Mockingjays or Tracker-jackers and the many obstacles created specifically for the Games; Abuse of Power; Human Rights; “Big Brother” or government control; Rebellion or Revolution…Also evident are themes of survival and self-preservation, personal independence, and even a Robin-Hood type mutiny against authority.

What is the meaning of the term shi’i?

What is the meaning of the term shi’i?

What is the meaning of the term shi’i?

What is the meaning of the term shi’i?
The term “shi’i” is a contraction of the phrase “shi’at Ali.”  This phrase means “partisans of Ali” or “party of Ali.”Ali was both the cousin of the prophet Muhammad and his son in law.  After Muhammad’s death, many Muslims believed that Ali should be the next leader of the faith because he was the closest living relative of the prophet.  However, he was passed over a number of times before finally becoming the caliph.  He was later assassinated.  The Shi’ites became a separate branch of Islam after Ali son, Husayn was assassinated in 680.So, the term “shi’i” comes from the fact that the Shi’ites started out as people who believed that the successors of the prophet should be people who were related to him.

What is the main action of Chapter 2in the book Lord of the Flies?I dont want a summary of Chapter 2, I just want the main action that happened.

What is the main action of Chapter 2in the book Lord of the Flies?I dont want a summary of Chapter 2, I just want the main action that happened.

What is the main action of Chapter 2in the book Lord of the Flies?I dont want a summary of Chapter 2, I just want the main action that happened.

What is the main action of Chapter 2in the book Lord of the Flies?I dont want a summary of Chapter 2, I just want the main action that happened.

A line parallel to y + x – 8 = 0 has a x intercept of 16. What is the distance between the x and y intercepts?

A line parallel to y + x – 8 = 0 has a x intercept of 16. What is the distance between the x and y intercepts?

A line parallel to y + x – 8 = 0 has a x intercept of 16. What is the distance between the x and y intercepts?

A line parallel to y + x – 8 = 0 has a x intercept of 16. What is the distance between the x and y intercepts?
The line y + x – 8 = 0, has a slope of -1. A line parallel to this also has a slope of -1. As the x-intercept of the parallel line is 16, it passes through the point (16, 0)The equation of the line is `(y – 0)/(x-16) = -1`=> y = -x + 16=> x + y – 16 = 0The y intercept of this line is where x = 0=> y – 16 = 0=> y = 16The y-intercept is (0, 16)The distance between the points (16, 0) and (0, 16) is `sqrt((16-0)^2 + (0-16)^2)`=> `sqrt(2*16^2)`=> `16*sqrt 2`The required distance between the x and y intercepts is `16*sqrt 2`

To what extent does Hamlet correspond to Aristotle’s notion of tragedy?

To what extent does Hamlet correspond to Aristotle’s notion of tragedy?

To what extent does Hamlet correspond to Aristotle’s notion of tragedy?

To what extent does Hamlet correspond to Aristotle’s notion of tragedy?
A tragedy, Aristotle wrote, is the imitation in dramatic form of an action that is serious and complete, with incidents arousing pity and fear; this drama, then, effects a catharsis of such emotions.  Pleasurable and appropriate to the situation, the language of a tragedy is often elevated and poetic.  Generally, there are six criteria for an Aristotelian definition of tragedy:The tragic hero is a man of noble status.  Certainly, Hamlet is such a man as the Prince of Denmark.  Critic Harold Bloom writes that Hamlet “transcends his play” as he seems from a realm far beyond the rancid atmosphere of Elsinore. The tragic hero is good, though not perfect, and his fall results from his committing “an act of injustice” (hamartia) either through ignorance of from a conviction that some greater good will be served. This hamartia stems from some excess of virtue–a nobility of chracter that makes the protagonist unfit for life among ordinary mortals. Hamlet’s soliloquies reveal intelligence and integrity as he reconsiders regicide based upon the wishes of a ghost, and he finds the actions of his mother base.  In The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche perceived Hamlet well, describing him not as the man who thinks too much; rather, he is the man who thinks too well.  Repulsed by the hypocrite Polonius, Hamlet stabs him through the curtain behind which he has been eavesdropping in Act III.The hero’s downfall is his own fault.  Hamlet chooses to fight Laertes in order to clean the corrupt court.Nonetheless, the hero’s misfortune is not wholly deserved. Clearly, Hamlet is, as Aristotle states, “better than ourselves.”  He deliberates throughout all his soliloquies.  When he watches Fortinbras, the “delicate and tender prince/Whose spirit, with divine ambition puffed,” Hamlet is moved to save Denmark by dueling with Laertes, but fate intervenes with Claudius who has poisoned the tip of Laertes’s sword.The tragic fall is not pure loss.  As the entire court of Denmark lies dead in the castle, the “tender” prince has taken the reign of the country.  After bequeathing the reign of his country to Fortinbras, Hamlet says, “He has my dying voice.”Although tragedy arouses compassion and awe, the audience does not become saddened.  For, there is a “catharsis,” an emotional release at the end. Knowing that the wicked are dead and a noble prince rules, the audience is relieved.Without question, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, his most famous and intriguing play as its protagonist possesses an intriguing individuality, meets the requirements of Aristotle’s definition of tragedy.

In Animal Farm, once the humans have been chased from the farm, what do the animals do?

In Animal Farm, once the humans have been chased from the farm, what do the animals do?

In Animal Farm, once the humans have been chased from the farm, what do the animals do?

In Animal Farm, once the humans have been chased from the farm, what do the animals do?
In George Orwell’s Animal Farm, once the humans have been driven from the farm the animals do many different things.First, the animals traverse the farm and burn all of the tools and machinery that the humans used to control the animals. The animals wish to rid the farm of all instruments which illustrate the power of mankind over animals. Second, the animals go into Mr. Jones’ farmhouse and decided to lock the door and make it into a museum.Another thing which happens after chasing the humans from the farm is the animals change the name of the farm from “Manor Farm” to “Animal Farm.” Lastly, Snowball decides to create a list of rules by which the animals will live by. These rules are known by the Seven Commandments. (Eventually, the rules are changed to be only one rule given some of the animals are unable to read and do not have great memories. The final rule is “Four legs good, two legs bad.” This change to the rules comes in chapter three.)

How does Achebe’s use of conflict reveal Okonkwo as a tragic hero?

How does Achebe’s use of conflict reveal Okonkwo as a tragic hero?

How does Achebe’s use of conflict reveal Okonkwo as a tragic hero?

How does Achebe’s use of conflict reveal Okonkwo as a tragic hero?
In Things Fall Apart, the author portrays Okonkwo as a tragic hero. Okonkwo is a strong, masculine hero who loses control in the face of conflict. The author presents Okonkwo as a leader who cannot handle change:Critics appreciate Achebe’s development of the conflict that arises when tradition clashes with change. He uses his characters and their unique language to portray the double tragedies that occur in the story. Readers identify not only with Okonkwo and his personal hardships but also with the Ibo culture and its disintegration.By the end of the story, Okonkwo fears that his village is changing for the worse. He cannot get his clan to go to war against the white man who has invaded his village.Although Okonkwo had been a powerful leader in his clan, he loses control in the end. He hangs himself out of fear. Okonkwo cannot deal with the change that has occurred in his village. He cannot face the conflict of losing control. He would rather die than to face the changes occurring in his village.In the end, Okonkwo becomes a tragic hero. His fear causes him to give up. He cannot fight the white man alone. Feeling utterly hopeless, Okonkwo takes his own life. In the face of conflict, Okonkwo gives in to his fears. Truly, Okonkwo wrestled with fear. First, he feared being like his lazy father. Then, he feared losing control of his social standing. Fear dominated his tragic life until he ended it.

On what grounds has Martin Luther been criticized by historians?

On what grounds has Martin Luther been criticized by historians?

On what grounds has Martin Luther been criticized by historians?

On what grounds has Martin Luther been criticized by historians?
I disagree with the above post. Luther did in fact criticize the peasantry in the German Peasants War of 1524-1526, but NOT because of his dependence on the ruling classes. Luther was himself of peasant stock, and sympathized with their cause; but he was opposed to violence. He believed that any differences of opinion should be addressed with Christian love. He honestly believed that because the peasants refused to compromise peaceably, that the devil was at work among them, and their rebellion would lead to anarchy and the end of civil government. It was on this basis that he wrote Against the Murderous, Thieving Hordes of the Peasants, which alienated him to many Peasants who in turn returned to Catholicism. Even so, a far greater criticism of Luther is from his polemics against the Jews. In a tract entitled Against the Jews and Their Lies (1542) he publicly advocated violence against them:They are real liars and bloodhounds who have not only continually perverted and falsified all of Scripture with their mendacious glosses from the beginning until the present day. Their heart’s most ardent sighing and yearning and hoping is set on the day on which they can deal with us Gentiles as they did with the Gentiles in Persia at the time of Esther. Oh, how fond they are of the book of Esther, which is so beautifully attuned to their bloodthirsty, vengeful, murderous yearning and hope. The sun has never shone on a more bloodthirsty and vengeful people than they are who imagine that they are God’s people who have been commissioned and commanded to murder and to slay the Gentiles. In fact, the most important thing that they expect of their Messiah is that he will murder and kill the entire world with their sword. They treated us Christians in this manner at the very beginning through out all the world. They would still like to do this if they had the power, and often enough have made the attempt, for which they have got their snouts boxed lustily.Therefore be on your guard against the Jews, knowing that wherever they have their synagogues, nothing is found but a den of devils in-which sheer self-glory, conceit, lies, blasphemy, and defaming of God and men are practiced most maliciously and vehming his eyes on them. God’s wrath has consigned them to the presumption that their boasting, their conceit, their slander of God, their cursing of all people are a true and a great service rendered to God — all of which is very fitting and becoming to such noble blood of the fathers and circumcised saints. This they believe despite the fact that they know they are steeped in manifest vices mently, just as the devils themselves do. And where you see or hear a Jew teaching, remember that you are hearing nothing but a venomous basilisk who poisons and kills people merrily by fasten- And with all this, they claim to be doing right. Be on your guard against them!Luther was, of course, a hero to the people of Germany and German nationalism. His words of the above diatribe were often quoted by Hitler and the Nazi’s to support their pogroms against the Jews. What greater criticism of him can there be?