What are the themes, social concerns and motifs that are prevalent in Brideshead Revisited?

What are the themes, social concerns and motifs that are prevalent in Brideshead Revisited?

What are the themes, social concerns and motifs that are prevalent in Brideshead Revisited?

What are the themes, social concerns and motifs that are prevalent in Brideshead Revisited?
Let us think for one moment about the important theme of memory in this book, which is of course a prevalent concern, as indicated by both the whole idea of visiting a place that you knew from your past, and the subtitle, which explicitly relates the novel to the memories of Charles Ryder. Above all, this book is a walk down memory lane as Charles revisits Brideshead mansion which triggers off the flashback that makes up the central part of this novel.Part of this theme is the recognition that the past for Charles is an idyllic place. This is signalled by the title given to Book One, which is “Et In Arcadia Ego,” which refers to Arcadia, a symbol for the golden age of pastoral romance and simplicity. Accordingly, the first book tells of a similar moment in the life of Charles when he first met Sebastian and of the wonderful time they had.Again and again, almost becoming a constant litany, Charles compares how things were in the past to how they are today, and finds the present constantly wanting. For example, in the Prologue, Charles rants on about “Young England” and its various deficiencies. The nostalgia presented in this book takes the form of stylised memories that are clearly embellished by the imagination of Charles. Consider the romanticised nature of the relationship between Charles and Sebastian and the way that this time period includes such comments as the following:I, at any rate, believed myself to be very near heaven, during those languid days at Brideshead.The sense of nostalgia, but also the way that time is marching by and their youth will fade so quickly, is something that Sebastian comments on too, for he says: “If it could only be like this always–always summer, always alone, the fruit always ripe.” Memory and nostalgia are therefore very important concerns of this novel, and let us remember that this is a work that focuses much more on the past than on the present.

How was Mikhail Gorbachev different from past leaders of the Soviet Union?

How was Mikhail Gorbachev different from past leaders of the Soviet Union?

How was Mikhail Gorbachev different from past leaders of the Soviet Union?

How was Mikhail Gorbachev different from past leaders of the Soviet Union?
After a long line of party bureaucrats including the almost colorless Leonid Brezhnev, the KGB geriatric Yuri Andropov, Konstantin Chernenko and others that seemed to be almost xerox copies of each other, Gorbachev was a breath of fresh air for people on both sides of the Iron Curtain.He had a personality.  He was pleasant, even charming at times.  He smiled and gave interviews to foreign journalists, on one occasion even leaving his limousine motorcade on a whim while in New York City just to shake hands with Americans on the sidewalk.  In this way he resembled more an American politician than a Russian dictator.He also approached communism differently.  While he believed in the system still, he thought it should be “adjusted” to fit the more modern economic realities of the 1980s.  He instituted a program called perestroika which meant “restructuring”.  He allowed limited private businesses and private property as an experiment to harness Soviet ingenuity and creativity.  He then announced the new policy of Glasnost, or openness.  He allowed newspaper reporters more freedom to write what they wanted, even to criticize the government a bit.  He put an end to shadowy KGB arrests for simply speaking an opinion in public. And he engaged the West and Ronald Reagan, negotiating over nuclear weapons.  His most decisive moment came when he decided not to send the Red Army in to crush revolts in Eastern Europe, letting the Warsaw Pact countries go their own way.Today, he is more popular in America than he is in Russia.

How to speak English.hello friends i`m ashish i want tolearn english online any bady can tell me the free websitefor…

How to speak English.hello friends i`m ashish i want tolearn english online any bady can tell me the free websitefor…

How to speak English.hello friends i`m ashish i want tolearn english online any bady can tell me the free websitefor…

How to speak English.hello friends i`m ashish i want tolearn english online any bady can tell me the free websitefor…
Songs and movies are invaluable, especially if you can find movies with subtitles in your language. Rosetta Stone is good as well, though, as the first response pointed out, it is quite expensive. Personally, I learned to understand Spanish (although not as well as I’d like) by watching soccer on Spanish language television. I know the terminology of the game in English, and hearing people describing familiar situations in Spanish helped me to learn the language, even a few colloquialisms. Immersion is the key, I think, to learning any language quickly. Spend as much time as possible each day hearing, reading, or speaking the language and you may surprise yourself at how quickly you learn.

How could we interpret the following quote from Heart of Darkness?"The room seemed to have grown darker, as if all the sad light of the cloudy…

How could we interpret the following quote from Heart of Darkness?"The room seemed to have grown darker, as if all the sad light of the cloudy…

How could we interpret the following quote from Heart of Darkness?"The room seemed to have grown darker, as if all the sad light of the cloudy…

How could we interpret the following quote from Heart of Darkness?"The room seemed to have grown darker, as if all the sad light of the cloudy…
This quote comes from the final section of the novel, when Marlow goes to visit the Intended and shared with her the final words of Kurtz and to pay his respects. It is vital that you realise the symbolism of the darkness and the light in this quote and indeed, in the section as a whole, as the way that the light coalesces around the Intended’s forehead is repeated more than once. Analysing how this image is used in the text helps us to reveal its meaning. Consider, for example, how the forehead is described later on. In response to the Intended’s claim that she knew Kurtz best, note how Marlow responds and how he describes what he sees:”You knew him best,” I repeated. And perhaps she did. But with every word spoken the room was growing darker, and only her forehead, smooth and white, remained illumined by the unextinguishable light of belief and love.If we consider the conversation between the Intended and Marlow, we see that the Intended does all the talking, and Marlow basically agrees with her, keeping silent. The Intended expresses an unshakeable belief in Kurtz and his ability and what he achieved, which we can relate to the ignorance of so many people surrounding the colonial endeavour. The fact that it is the forehead that is white, which is where the brain is, emphasises the way in which our brains and thinking can become seduced by big narratives such as the colonial story of saving and helping those less fortunate than ourselves. However, Marlow, after his experiences, can only note the darkness that surrounds the Intended and the way that her forehead and her words points towards her complete ignorance about both Kurtz and the true nature of colonialism, and of man himself.

In what ways does Wiesel relate not only his own nightmarish memory of the Holocaust but also humanity’s?

In what ways does Wiesel relate not only his own nightmarish memory of the Holocaust but also humanity’s?

In what ways does Wiesel relate not only his own nightmarish memory of the Holocaust but also humanity’s?

In what ways does Wiesel relate not only his own nightmarish memory of the Holocaust but also humanity’s?
I think that one of the reasons why Wiesel’s work is utterly profound is because he is able to pull out a subjective experience of horror and then connect it to an objective setting.  Wiesel’s narrative is focused on the pain that Eliezer must endure.  Yet, Wiesel also focuses on how this experience is a result of the lack of humanity and constant dehumanization that enveloped him in his being in the world at this time.  Wiesel is smart enough and keen enough to understand that the true terror of the Holocaust was how so many people, Nazis and non- Nazis, engaged in the dehumanization of other people.  The dehumanization of which Wiesel speaks is one where people of Sighet dehumanize and demonize Moshe the Beadle or do the same to Madame Schachter.  In this, Wiesel is able to make the point that the Holocaust results from the silencing of voices that the Nazis started, but so many were able to continue in their absence.  The dehumanization and lack of dignity with which the Nazis treated people became absorbed by their targets, who did much of the same.  It is in this light where Wiesel’s own nightmarish experience is broadened to a condition of universality from the subjective realm.

Can you please interpret this section, it is really stumping me.The other terror that scares us from self-trust is our consistency, a reverence for…

Can you please interpret this section, it is really stumping me.The other terror that scares us from self-trust is our consistency, a reverence for…

Can you please interpret this section, it is really stumping me.The other terror that scares us from self-trust is our consistency, a reverence for…

Can you please interpret this section, it is really stumping me.The other terror that scares us from self-trust is our consistency, a reverence for…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…

Examine the character of Emily in Our Town. She tells her mother, " I’m the brightest girl in school for my age…"What is her tone here?Is she…
Emily is bragging, though what she says is true. This statement provides us with a concise exposition of Emily’s character and also connects later to her realization that people are essentially blind. Emily is very bright. Though she is bragging about being the “brightest girl in school”, she is not exaggerating. She is bright, articulate, and, despite the anxiety she shares with her mother, a beautiful creature. Other characters recognize Emily’s intellect as well. George comments on Emily’s ease with school work in their first meeting of the play. When Emily tells her mother that she is the brightest girl in her class, she strikes a tone of childish confidence. She is literally expressing the brightness of her character, her hopes, her joy, and her desire for approval and success. This tone can be seen as “closed off” in the context of Emily’s post-death revelation. As a girl, Emily is aware only of herself and her needs and is blind to the wealth of beauty around her.

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?

What are themes for The Hunger Games?
Advantages to the Wealthy vs. Disadvantages to the Poor or Fairness in Wealth Distribution; Man-made vs. Naturally-made, as in the Mockingjays or Tracker-jackers and the many obstacles created specifically for the Games; Abuse of Power; Human Rights; “Big Brother” or government control; Rebellion or Revolution…Also evident are themes of survival and self-preservation, personal independence, and even a Robin-Hood type mutiny against authority.